The Eyeballing Game

Mentioned many times on this site is that you will draw better when you have an accurate eye; that learning to draw is actually learning to see. To help you with the process, in early 2016 I wrote an ebook, titled An Accurate Eye. Recently brought to my attention is an online eye accuracy trainer: The Eyeballing Game, that nicely supplements the book’s exercises.

An Accurate Eye

You can draw better when you can see better. An Accurate Eye: Learn to Draw Better by Learning to See Better contains over two-dozen practical exercises suitable for everyone who wants to improve their visual accuracy.

A Missing Clavicle and An Educated Eye

One of my private students recently told me of an experience that he had which showed him how our sight is influenced by what we know. During one of his classes at university, his professor explained how our perceptions are susceptible to prior knowledge. He proved that what we intellectually learn can influence what we see (or think we see).

The Value of Squinting

What happens when we squint? Most atelier students know the answer, or at least part of it. With this article I hope to open everyone’s eyes a little and to perhaps shed some light on the value of squinting.

Developing an Accurate Eye

Much of the activity that takes place when learning to draw is centered on developing an accurate eye. In fact, when a teacher critiques a student’s work, he or she is essentially looking for inaccuracies. Over the last few articles I have outlined some specifics, relative to what a student can do to improve their visual accuracy, and in this article I’m going to layout an overall plan.

Intervals

Intervals are the spaces between points. An accurate eye correctly sees not only singular points and intervals, but ever larger groups of them. Therefore, as you improve your eye’s accuracy for specifics, you should also seek to increase your ability to accurately see in larger segments.

Practicing Scales

Few skills are learned in bulk. They are learned one step at a time. Take learning to play the piano for example. We all know that budding pianists spend countless hours practicing scales. Why is it any different for learning how to draw?